Madhya Pradesh
 
     
Travel Madhya Pradesh in India  
  amarkantak  
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  Ujjain 

 
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Madhya Pradesh



 
Madhya Pradesh Madhya Pradesh
 

It has a thick forest cover and the countryside is sparsely populated. M.P with its magnificent pink cliffs, wild waters, architectural ruins and paintings made in rock shelters, illustrates the fact that the history of the state goes back half a million years. Holding most of India's mineral deposits, it also houses two of India's best National Parks - Kanha and Bandhavgarh. M.P. echoes with the history of great heroes, who left behind them breathtaking masterpieces of Indian architecture. It is a destination with a legendary past, and its temple architecture and awesome landscape of ravines and mountains are a sight to behold.

Madhya Pradesh

Madhya Pradesh, a central state of India is the prime cultural and religious hub of Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism and Islam. Famous for Khajuraho temples - 'A World Heritage Site', exquisitely carved Jain temples, forts, palaces, the state is the glorious reminders of erstwhile era of Rajas and Maharahas. The medieval cities, wildlife sanctuaries and holy pilgrimage centers of Madhya Pradesh offer a memorable experience to the tourists. Some of the famous destinations of Madhya Pradesh include are Khajuraho, Bandhavgarh, Kanha National Park, Bhopal, Gwalior, Ujjain, Indore.

Madhya Pradesh has a state legislature of 320 seats. The state elects 40 members to the Rajya Sabha. With the exception of 1977 and 1989 the Congress I has held a comfortable majority, though the BJP (Bharatiya Janata Party) has always had a strong following too. In December 1993 the BJP suffered a reverse, the Congress I winning power again in the State Assembly and Digvijay Singh was named Chief Minister.

In the 1998 election, despite strong poll predictions that indicated otherwise, the Congress was voted back to power with a good majority. Digvijay Singh is still the Chief Minister of the state. The Maharaja of Gwalior Madhavrao Scindia remains a popular local and national politician.

Madhya Pradesh

Madhya Pradesh has numerous rivers, the important ones being Narmada, Chambal, Betwa, Shipra, Sone, Mahanadi, Indrawati and Tapti. All these rivers have played a considerable role in making Madhya Pradesh what it is today – be it the cities, the culture, or the ravines.

Theres an old Indian adage, atithi devo bhava a guest is as God. Over the centuries this has been drilled so deep into succeeding generations of Indians that hospitality is almost next to godliness here.

The people of Madhya Pradesh are a very warm and hospitable lot. People invite you for lunch and dinner at the drop of a hat. In the villages, especially, the hospitality can be quite overwhelming. Appetizers, piping hot food, second helpings and desserts are offered to the visitor as if theres no tomorrow.

Refusing any course or helping is out of the question as it is taken as an insult to the host and his kitchen.

Indian meals are large, leisurely affairs with tables groaning under food and lots of heady (and heated!) conversation. Nobody believes in eating less of more here. If you like a dish you are expected to eat more of it; more often than not the hostess will serve you a generous second helping herself.

Madhya Pradesh

It is good manners to praise a dish; if you churlishly refuse to, your considerate host will take offence. Refusal to eat even a single course can lead to a crowd of people fussing all over you, pressing alternative dishes. At the end of a heavy meal if you burp dont be surprised to see an approving, indulgent smile playing on the hosts face. Burping is a sort of Indian equivalent of my compliments to the chef; I liked the food so much Ive stuffed myself silly.


 
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